Culture matters, too: achieving Ecological Economic outcomes through the expression of Māori cultural identity

Abstract This report explores emerging technology-based creative activities of Māori communities in New Zealand as part of their efforts to achieve the goals of cultural wellbeing and survival. We use

Cultural Impact assessment – Te Matā … Te Mata o Tipuna

This report focuses attention on a home (i.e. Te Matā … Te Mata o Tipuna), an ancestor and maunga tapu (transl. sacred mountain) that provided for the wellbeing and survival

Te Toi Ōhanga™

The name ‘Te Toi Ōhanga™’ uses the poetic power of the Māori language to describe the existence of a summit or high point in the development of indigenous (Māori) economics.

An introduction to ecosystem services

The neo-liberal market model of economics is in very simple terms an attempt to create an economy that is guided and directed by price signals rather than government policies, rules

Origins and mission of Te Toi Ōhanga

Te Toi Ōhanga is a whānau business, the origins of which maybe explained as follows. Our first company (i.e. Pansophy Limited) was incorporated as a New Zealand company on the

Why do we need a Māori (cultural) economy?

The expression of kawa, kaupapa and tikanga maintained the wellbeing and survival of Te Aho Matua, Te Aho Matua whānau o Rangi rāua ko Papatūānuku for approximately 800–1,000 years prior

Towards an understanding of barriers to the Māori cultural adoption and use of information technology and systems in the expression of kaitiakitanga.

Abstract This Report (7c) is one of a 3-part series of pūtaiao reports that: (i) provides a literature review on the topic of Māori adoption and use of information technology

Community-based monitoring and the expression of kaitiakitanga: similarities and differences

Abstract This report grew out of a 6-year creative activity [1] (FRST, 2008) named Manaaki Taha Moana aimed at understanding how hapū [2] and iwi involvement in the expression of kaitiakitanga can

Enhancing the expression of kaitiakitanga with the aid of information technology and systems

Abstract This report outlines key IT results from a 6-year creative activity [1] programme (FRST, 2008) named Manaaki Taha Moana aimed at understanding how hapū [2] and iwi involvement in kaitiakitanga can