Culture matters, too: achieving Ecological Economic outcomes through the expression of Māori cultural identity

Abstract
This report explores emerging technology-based creative activities of Māori communities in New Zealand as part of their efforts to achieve the goals of cultural wellbeing and survival. We use this narrative as an opportunity to better understand a more complex meta-narrative that concerns the wellbeing and survival of an estimated 7,100 human cultures on planet Earth. This meta-narrative is particularly important as a basis for exploring possible limitations of the current pre-analytic vision of an emerging trans-discipline called Ecological Economics. Ecological Economics emerged in the late 1990s in an attempt to create a conversation between economists and ecologists as an academic (i.e. theoretical and applied) contribution towards creating an efficient, socially fair, ecologically sustainable (global) economy. As such, this report will be of interest to Māori scholars because it shows that one of the most important and signficiant scholarly critiques of conventional (market) economic thinking, is still based on a pre-analytic vision of reality that falls well short of embracing the urgent need that exists to address the global problem of human cultural extinction. As such, this report draws on descriptive, narrative, theoretical, methodological and cross-cultural knowledge to both argue and assert that culture matters, too.

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Reference and download link

Cole, A. O. me ōna tūpuna, and McCallion, A. (2014) Culture matters, too: achieving Ecological Economic outcomes through the expression of Māori cultural identity. Kōrero Māori report 1, (pp. 31). Tauranga, New Zealand. iPansophy Limited Digital Publishing. [Download]

 

 

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